Kindergarten Readiness Test - Assess Your Child

This kindergarten readiness test will guide you through the eight developmental areas related to success in preschool and kindergarten, highlighting skills that your child will need in school. After completing this readiness test, you will see personalized commentary about your child and tailored suggestions to help him or her develop skills that are essential for beginning school prepared to succeed.

You have an existing assessment in progress, but you can start a new one if you wish.

Gross Motor

Walks forward on a straight line Not yet Occasionally Consistently
Walks backward on a straight line Not yet Occasionally Consistently
Walks sideways on a straight line (take a sideways step, then bring the other foot to meet the first) Not yet Occasionally Consistently
Jumps on two feet, with both feet leaving the ground at the same time Not yet Occasionally Consistently
Hops on one foot Not yet Occasionally Consistently
Kicks a stationary ball with accuracy Not yet Occasionally Consistently
Throws a ball with accuracy Not yet Occasionally Consistently
Skips Not yet Occasionally Consistently
Dresses himself Not yet Occasionally Consistently
Continue to Fine Motor assessment (Section 2 of 8) or see assessment results

Fine Motor

Correctly uses a fork/spoon to feed himself Not yet Occasionally Consistently
Places multiple large beads on a string Not yet Occasionally Consistently
Correctly uses scissors to cut a straight line Not yet Occasionally Consistently
Correctly uses scissors to cut a circle Not yet Occasionally Consistently
Uses the proper pincer grip to hold a pencil or crayon Not yet Occasionally Consistently
Correctly draws a circle and square Not yet Occasionally Consistently
Correctly draws a triangle and an X Not yet Occasionally Consistently
Uses the proper pincer grip to use tweezers to pick up and hold small items Not yet Occasionally Consistently
Continue to Auditory Processing assessment (Section 3 of 8) or see assessment results

Auditory Processing

Understands positional words (example: up, down, beside, over, under, near, far, high, low, etc.) 0-2 words 3-6 words 7+ words
Follows one-step directions without needing directions repeated Not yet Occasionally Consistently
Follows multiple-step directions without needing directions repeated Not yet Occasionally Consistently
Identifies common sounds and/or can distinguish different voices on the phone, radio or television (example: car horn, train whistle, barking dog) Not yet Occasionally Consistently
Responds appropriately to basic questions such as "Where are your shoes?" or "Do you like pizza?" Not yet Occasionally Consistently
Continue to Visual Discrimination assessment (Section 4 of 8) or see assessment results

Visual Discrimination

Identifies colors by name 0-2 colors 3-6 colors 7+ colors
Identifies shapes by name 0-2 shapes 3-6 shapes 7+ shapes
Points to specific objects in a book when asked (for example, "Point to the blue hat" or "Point to the little girl") Not yet Occasionally Consistently
Can comment on differences between pictures in a book (for example, "That hat is blue, but that hat is red" or "That car is smaller than the other car") Not yet Occasionally Consistently
Continue to Letter/Word Awareness assessment (Section 5 of 8) or see assessment results

Letter/Word Awareness

Names all the letters in his first name (can "spell aloud" his first name) Not yet Occasionally Consistently
Names upper case letters when shown letters in random order 0-5 letters 6-20 letters 21+ letters
When shown a letter, can produce the sound made by that letter 0-5 letters 6-20 letters 21+ letters
Identifies words in books and magazines (for example, responds appropriately when asked "Point to the word that begins with the letter M") Not yet Occasionally Consistently
Claps once on each word when repeating a three- or four-word sentence Not yet Occasionally Consistently
Identifies and "reads" frequently seen words such as familiar signs or words in a favorite book (sight words) 0-2 words 3-10 words 11+ words
Continue to Phonemic Awareness assessment (Section 6 of 8) or see assessment results

Phonemic Awareness

Creates a string of 3 or more rhyming words Not yet Occasionally Consistently
Is able to supply words that begin with the same sound as a given word Not yet Occasionally Consistently
Is able to repeat tongue twisters that highlight a specific sound (examples: "Peter Piper" or "Betty Butter") Not yet Occasionally Consistently
Claps once on each syllable when repeating a two-, three-, or four-syllable word Not yet Occasionally Consistently
Continue to Math/Number Awareness assessment (Section 7 of 8) or see assessment results

Math/Number Awareness

Counts from memory to: 5 10-20 21+
Names printed numerals when seen in random order 0-5 numerals 6-10 numerals 11+ numerals
Accurately counts a group of objects up to: 0-5 6-15 16+
Sorts objects (beans, cereal, blocks) into groups based on identifying characteristics such as size, color or shape Not yet Occasionally Consistently
Identifies and can continue an ABAB pattern (example: red block, blue block, red block, blue block) Not yet Occasionally Consistently
Continue to Social/Emotional Development assessment (Section 8 of 8) or see assessment results

Social/Emotional Development

Cooperates with his parents/caretakers Not yet Occasionally Consistently
Separates from parents without getting upset Not yet Occasionally Consistently
Interacts comfortably with peers without adult intervention Not yet Occasionally Consistently
Initiates independent play without adult direction (is self-directed) Not yet Occasionally Consistently
Stays focused until a task is completed Not yet Occasionally Consistently
Perseveres on challenging tasks without becoming frustrated Not yet Occasionally Consistently
Waits patiently for an adult's attention Not yet Occasionally Consistently
Shows empathy or compassion for others' feelings Not yet Occasionally Consistently
Expresses needs or thoughts clearly Not yet Occasionally Consistently
Expresses needs or thoughts clearly using multiple, complete sentences Not yet Occasionally Consistently
See assessment results

Kindergarten Readiness Assessment Results

Congratulations on completing the assessment and taking this exciting first step towards helping your child start school prepared to succeed!

In order for your child to start kindergarten with the tools necessary to hit the ground running, he should have comfort with skills in all 8 developmental areas. As you review the following assessment, keep in mind that it is rare for children to excel in all areas. But, with focused practice, you can help your child gain necessary skills in areas that are still developing and further build confidence in areas that seem to be well developed.

Please bookmark this page so that you can also review these results later. If you would like to start over, you can begin a new assessment.

Your Child's Readiness At a Glance

Kindergarten readiness at a glance

Gross Motor

Your child's basic gross motor skills of walking and running may be well established. However, he is still working to develop more advanced gross motor skills which will be essential to early success in school. Now is the perfect time to begin working with your child on specific gross motor activities. Focused practice will accelerate his gross motor development and ensure he gains essential confidence in his abilities. Consider activities such as directing your child to walk forwards and backwards on a narrow line, gallop like a horse, or kick a ball to accelerate his gross motor development.
Your child has a nice foundation of gross motor skills. However, he has not yet gained sufficient comfort or proficiency with all of the gross motor skills that will be required in the classroom. This is a sign that he may not yet have complete bilateral integration (the ability to fluidly coordinate motions on both sides of the body at the same time), which is necessary for smooth gross motor movements. Now is the perfect time to begin working with your child on specific gross motor activities. This will help accelerate his gross motor development. Consider activities such directing your child to march in a straight line while tapping his left knee with his right hand and his right knee with his left hand or kick a ball rolling towards him. With practice, your child can build a strong base of gross motor skills and further gain muscle tone and control. This will prepare him for even more advanced gross motor activities, including those needed when engaging in organized sports.
Your child's gross motor skills are generally well developed. Although, there are still a few areas where your child is showing a bit of hesitancy in coordinating movements on both sides of his body. This is a sign that he may not yet have complete bilateral integration (the ability to fluidly coordinate motions on both sides of the body at the same time), which is necessary for fluid gross motor movements. Now is the perfect time to begin working with your child on specific gross motor activities. This will help accelerate his gross motor development. Consider activities such as directing your child to march in a straight line while tapping his left knee with his right hand and his right knee with his left hand or kick a ball rolling towards him. With practice, your child can build a strong base of gross motor skills and further gain muscle tone and control. This will prepare him for even more advanced gross motor activities, including those needed when engaging in organized sports.
Your child is very comfortable with gross motor skills and is ready to jump, skip and leap into all gross motor activities in the kindergarten classroom! To help your child maintain his existing skill set and continue to build muscle tone, continue working with your child on specific gross motor activities. Consider activities such as directing your child to march in a straight line while tapping his left knee with his right hand and his right knee with his left hand or kick a moving ball while running towards it to help accelerate his gross motor development. With practice, your child can build an even broader base of gross motor skills and further increase muscle tone and control. This will prepare him for even more advanced gross motor activities, including those needed when engaging in organized sports.

Review your responses to Gross Motor questions

Fine Motor

Your child has not yet developed important fine motor skills which will be critical to his success in school. To help make sure he learns the proper grips for small, hand-held objects such as crayons, scissors, and tweezers, now is the ideal time to begin working with him. Specific fine motor activities such as tracing shapes and letters and cutting along straight, curved, and zigzag lines will be perfect for helping your child gain the necessary fine motor skills for success in school. Learning the proper grips now will also save him the difficulty of unlearning the improper grips once he begins school. And once he has the proper foundation, he will be prepared to tackle more advanced fine motor skills such as freehand letter writing and freehand cutting of abstract shapes.
Your child's fine motor skills are beginning to develop and he's showing some level of comfort using the correct grip style when writing with a crayon or pencil. However, he is not yet completely comfortable with all of the fine motor skills such as cutting complex shapes. Given your child's basic fine motor skills and strong interest in using his hands and fingers to explore, now is a great time to begin working with him on specific fine motor activities. With practice, you can help make sure he learns the proper grips for all small, hand-held items such as crayons, scissors, and tweezers and gains comfort using these tools. Activities such as tracing letters and shapes and threading increasingly small beads on increasingly less rigid cords will help develop his fine motor skills. As your child is introduced to writing letters and words in school, well-developed fine motor skills will allow him to quickly master these complicated fine motor tasks.
Your child has a nice foundation of fine motor skills. However, he is not yet completely comfortable with all of the fine motor skills such as tracing and cutting complex shapes. Given your child's strong foundation of fine motor skills, now is a great time to work with him on specific fine motor activities to help him hone and solidify his skills. Activities such as cutting long curved lines, drawing letters and shapes with precision, and using tweezers to carefully move small items will accelerate his development of critical fine motor skills. As your child is introduced to writing letters and words in school, well-developed fine motor skills will allow him to quickly master these complicated fine motor tasks.
Your child has well-developed fine motor skills and is poised to excel in the kindergarten classroom at fine motor activities. It will be important for him to continue honing those skills and gaining increased confidence in his abilities so he will be ready to tackle increasingly complicated fine motor activities in the classroom. Activities such as cutting along curved lines, drawing letters and shapes freehand with precision, and using tweezers to carefully move small items between containers would be perfect activities for your child to ensure he remains challenged.

Review your responses to Fine Motor questions

Auditory Processing

Your child is still "developing his ear" and does not yet have well-developed auditory processing skills. This may be due to his young age. This may also be because he has fallen into an unfortunate (but common) habit of not listening. The good news is that auditory processing skills can be taught and poor listening habits can be corrected. Now is the perfect time to begin working with your child on focused auditory processing activities. Consider activities such as giving two- and three-step directions without repeating yourself or having him close his eyes and identify different sounds he hears outside. An ability to consistently listen to and follow a teacher's directions, at the first request, is critical to success in the classroom. Teachers typically do not repeat instructions and a child who is unable to follow instructions at the first request will likely feel lost and confused in the classroom.
Your child is beginning the process of developing strong auditory processing skills. But, he still has considerable room for growth and improvement in this area before he will be ready to excel in a kindergarten classroom. This may be due to his young age. This may also be because he has fallen into an unfortunate (but common) habit of not listening. An ability to consistently listen to and follow a teacher's directions, at the first request, is critical to success in the classroom. Teachers typically do not repeat instructions and a child who is unable to follow instructions at the first request will likely feel lost and confused in the classroom. The good news is that auditory processing skills can be taught and poor listening habits can be corrected. Now is the perfect time to begin working with your child on focused auditory processing activities. Consider activities such as giving two- and three-step directions without repeating yourself or having him close his eyes and identify different sounds he hears outside. These types of activities will ensure he continues developing critical auditory processing skills and is well-positioned to meet the auditory processing challenges that await him in school.
Your child's auditory precessing skills are developing nicely. However, he is still not listening with the consistent attention that will be required in a kindergarten classroom. An ability to consistently listen to and follow a teacher's directions, at the first request, is critical to success in the classroom. Teachers typically do not repeat instructions and a child who is unable to follow instructions at the first request will likely feel lost and confused in the classroom. By working with him on specific activities and games designed to develop and hone auditory processing skills, you can help him further develop strong listening skills. You can also help him avoid the unfortunate (but common) habit of simply not listening to or "tuning out" adults. As a result, now is the perfect time to work with your child on focused auditory processing activities. Consider playing a game with your child where you ask him to follow four-, five-, or six-step directions without repeating yourself, keeping track of how many directions he can follow in a row. This type of activity will ensure he continues honing his already strong auditory processing skills and is well-positioned to meet the auditory processing challenges that await him in school.
Your child has strong auditory processing skills and is listening with the consistent attention that will be required in a kindergarten classroom. He also has a nice mastery of positional words (such as up, down, under and over), which will allow him to easily follow oral instructions given in the classroom. To ensure he continues exercising and honing his auditory processing skills and avoids the unfortunate (but common) habit of simply not listening to or "tuning out" adults, continue to engage him in focused auditory processing activities. Consider playing a game with your child where you ask him to follow four-, five-, or six-step directions without repeating yourself, keeping track of how many directions he can follow in a row. This is a great way to ensure your child continues to strengthen his already strong auditory processing skills.

Review your responses to Auditory Processing questions

Visual Discrimination

Your child is not yet fully aware of the many variations in the images he sees everyday. Success in kindergarten requires strong visual discrimination skills as teachers typically utilize bulletin board displays, printed worksheets, and chalkboard depictions in daily lessons. Also, your child will be expected to easily distinguish between his numerous classmates and identify his specific locker, cubby, or desk among the many similar lockers, cubbies and desks in the classroom. Visual discrimination skills are advanced only through practice and repeated exposure to visually distinct images. By working with your child on visual discrimination exercises such as differentiating between different shapes and colors or identifying the differences between people at the store or cars on the street, he will quickly gain awareness of the many (both minor and pronounced) variations in the images and objects he encounters. When this occurs, he will be ready to tackle the many challenges in a kindergarten classroom that rely on strong visual discrimination skills, such as sorting, classifying and distinguishing between similarly formed but different letters (including I, T, and F, for example) and numbers (including 6 and 9, for example).
Your child is beginning to notice differences in the images he sees everyday. Knowing the names of some shapes and colors is a great start. Success in kindergarten requires strong visual discrimination skills as teachers typically utilize bulletin board displays, printed worksheets, and chalkboard depictions in daily lessons. Also, your child will be expected to easily distinguish between his numerous classmates and identify his specific locker, cubby, or desk among the many similar lockers, cubbies and desks in the classroom. Visual discrimination skills are advanced only through practice and repeated exposure to visually distinct images. By working with your child on visual discrimination exercises such as differentiating between different shapes and colors or identifying the differences between people at the store or cars on the street, he will quickly gain awareness of the many (both minor and pronounced) variations in the images and objects he encounters. When this occurs, he will be ready to tackle the many challenges in a kindergarten classroom that rely on strong visual discrimination skills, such as sorting, classifying and distinguishing between similarly formed but different letters (including I, T, and F, for example) and numbers (including 6 and 9, for example).
Your child is aware of the many large differences in the images he sees everyday. However, he is still learning to identify some of the more subtle differences. Success in kindergarten requires strong visual discrimination skills as teachers typically utilize bulletin board displays, printed worksheets, and chalkboard depictions in daily lessons. Also, your child will be expected to easily distinguish between his numerous classmates and identify his specific locker, cubby, or desk among the many similar lockers, cubbies and desks in the classroom. Visual discrimination skills are advanced only through practice and repeated exposure to visually distinct images. Consider working with your child on visual discrimination exercises such as reviewing similarly formed but different letters (including I, T, and F, for example), numbers (including 6 and 9, for example) and images (including a red apple and a red tomato, for example). Through this practice, he will quickly gain awareness of the many (both minor and pronounced) variations in the images and objects he encounters. When this occurs, he will be ready to tackle the numerous challenges in a kindergarten classroom that rely on strong visual discrimination skills, such as sorting and classifying.
Your child has a great foundation of visual discrimination skills. Success in kindergarten requires strong visual discrimination skills as teachers typically utilize bulletin board displays, printed worksheets, and chalkboard depictions in daily lessons. Also, your child will be expected to easily distinguish between his numerous classmates and identify his specific locker, cubby, or desk among the many similar lockers, cubbies and desks in the classroom. Given his existing skills, your child is well-positioned to enter the kindergarten classroom with excellent visual discrimination skills. Consider engaging him in visual discrimination activities to help him increase the speed and comfort with which he identifies differences in objects and images. For example, try putting ten objects on the table and then having your child look away as you remove two or three and then identify which objects were removed. Activities of this nature will help him continue to hone his existing visual discrimination skills and will accelerate his ability to master more complicated tasks that rely on strong visual discrimination.

Review your responses to Visual Discrimination questions

Letter/Word Awareness

Your child does not yet have a well-formed awareness of letters and words and is still struggling to make sense of the printed letters he sees. To an untrained eye, letters are merely markings on a page. It takes special attention to recognize that letters actually represent unique sounds that combine to form words. Since letter and word identification is a critical precursor to learning to read and learning to write, you will want to work with your child to advance his skills in this area. A great first step in working with your child should be introducing him to the names of the uppercase and then lowercase letters. Once your child has this knowledge, you can progress to more advanced skills such as identifying a group of letters as a word. Consider activities such as clapping once on each word in a sentence or matching lowercase letters to their uppercase partners to advance his skills in this area.
Your child is just beginning to discover that each letter is unique and plays a different role in word formation. To an untrained eye, letters are merely markings on a page. It takes special attention to recognize that letters actually represent unique sounds that combine to form words. Since letter and word identification is a critical precursor to learning to read and learning to write, you will want to work with your child to establish greater familiarity with letter identification and word recognition. Consider activities such as clapping once on each word in a sentence or matching lowercase letters to their uppercase partners to advance his skills in this area.
Your child has a strong understanding that each letter is unique and makes a distinct sound. He also has a beginning understanding that letters form words. This is a great starting point. However, he is still working to master some of the advanced word awareness skills, such as creating a vocabulary of words he can "read" on sight, through memorization of what the word looks like (called sight reading). Since letter and word identification is a critical precursor to learning to read and learning to write, you will want to work with your child to advance his skills in this area so he can enter the kindergarten classroom with the solid foundation needed to approach and master these advanced skills. Consider helping him further develop his sight-word vocabulary by writing a few commonly used words (such as his first name, family members' names, and favorite foods) on note cards and periodically looking at the cards together as your read the word and point to each letter. Once your child is able to identify a few words on sight, you can add more words to his "sight word vocabulary."
Your child has a strong understanding that each letter is unique and that letters form words. He also has a well-formed vocabulary of words he can "read" on sight, through memorization of what the word looks like (called sight reading). These abilities will allow him to begin kindergarten ready to excel with any phonics program offered in the classroom. Continue to challenge your child by adding to his sight word vocabulary and by encouraging his natural interest in attempting to decode (read) written words. This can be accomplished by writing a few commonly used words (such as favorite foods, store names, and words from a favorite book) on note cards and periodically looking at the cards together as you read the word and point to each letter. Continue adding more words to your child's "sight word vocabulary" as his skills increase. An expansive "sight word vocabulary" will dramatically increase his reading speed.

Review your responses to Letter/Word Awareness questions

Phonemic Awareness

Your child does not yet have well-formed phonemic awareness skills. This is likely due to his young age as phonemic awareness skills typically develop later than other essential skills such as fine motor or visual discrimination. This may also be due to a lack of focused practice. For example, your child may possess the developmental ability to complete some of the basic phonemic awareness skills such as rhyming two or three words, but may not understand your direction to "say a word that rhymes with ..." Through practice with activities specifically designed to highlight individual sounds (called phonemes) in spoken words, such as rhyming games or consonant repetition, your child will gain critical skills in this area. Strong phonemic awareness skills combine with strong letter/word awareness skills to form the foundation for reading and writing. Because of this, your child would benefit from increased comfort and competency with phonemic awareness activities before beginning school. Consider activities such as taking turns with your child saying words that begin with a common consonant sound (such as cat, cup, kit, cabin, etc.) or creating a string of rhyming words (such as cat, mat, sat, etc.) to accelerate his skill development in this area.
Your child is beginning to develop critical phonemic awareness skills. However, he is still not yet comfortable isolating individual sounds (called phonemes) in spoken words. This may due to his young age as phonemic awareness skills typically develop later than other essential skills such as fine motor or visual discrimination. This may also be due to a lack of focused practice. For example, your child may possess the developmental ability to complete some of the basic phonemic awareness skills such as rhyming two or three words, but may not understand your direction to "say a word that rhymes with ..." Or your child may have never heard a tongue twister or other sentence which repeats a single consonant sound numerous times. Through practice with activities specifically designed to highlight individual sounds (called phonemes) in spoken words, such as rhyming games or consonant repetition, your child will gain critical skills in this area. Strong phonemic awareness skills combine with strong letter/word awareness skills to form the foundation for reading and writing. Consider activities such as taking turns with your child saying words that begin with a common sound (such as cat, cup, cabin, etc.) or creating a string of rhyming words (such as cat, mat, sat, etc.) to accelerate his skill development in this area. Once your child has mastered these activities, move to the more challenging activity of taking turns with your child saying words that end with a common sound (such as hat, mit, not, etc.), as ending sounds are more difficult to distinguish than initial sounds.
Your child's phonemic awareness skills are generally well-developed. However, he is still not yet completely comfortable isolating individual sounds (called phonemes) in spoken words. Because of his success with the more basic phonemic awareness activities, his lack of comfort with the more advanced activities is likely due only to a lack of focused practice. For example, your child may have never heard a tongue twister or other sentences which repeat a single consonant sound numerous times. Through practice and increased exposure to activities specifically designed to highlight phonemes in spoken words, such as rhyming games or consonant repetition, your child will gain critical skills in this area. Strong phonemic awareness skills combine with strong letter/word awareness skills to form the foundation for reading and writing. Consider activities such as taking turns with your child saying words that begin with a common sound (such as cat, cup, cabin, etc.). Once your child has mastered this activity, move to the more challenging activity of taking turns with your child saying words that end with a common sound (such as hat, mit, not, etc.), as ending sounds are more difficult to distinguish than initial sounds.
Your child has strong phonemic awareness skills and is able to hear and distinguish the individual sounds in spoken words. This will put your child in a great position when he begins school. Strong phonemic awareness skills combine with strong letter/word awareness skills to form the foundation for reading and writing. By continuing to work with your child on advanced activities such as identifying and isolating individual sounds in multi-syllable words, you will further increase both his skill level and his self confidence. Consider activities such taking turns with your child saying words that end with a common sound (such as hat, mit, not, etc.), as ending sounds are more difficult to distinguish than initial sounds.

Review your responses to Phonemic Awareness questions

Math/Number Awareness

Your child is not yet aware of numbers and the role they play in counting and organizing items. It will be important for your child to gain a basic knowledge of both numbers and numerals (the symbols that represent each number) before he begins school. To promote your child's skill development in this area, consider activities such as giving him a specific number of food items for a snack (such as 10 crackers) and then counting together as he eats them. Or, put a card with a numeral printed on it in a small container and encourage your child to gather that number of small toys and put them in the container with the card. As your child becomes comfortable with increasingly complicated math concepts, he will begin to think of himself as "good at math." This confidence will fuel his willingness to approach and persevere through increasingly complicated math activities.
Your child has a baseline familiarity with numbers and is gaining comfort with the important first step of counting to and past 10. It will be important for your child to further develop knowledge of both numbers and numerals (the symbols that represent each number) before he begins school. To promote your child's skill development in this area, consider giving him a bowl of 4 or 5 different bite-size snacks for dessert and encouraging him to eat them in a specific order (such as one grape, one cereal flake, one raisin, one pretzel rod) before repeating the pattern again. Or, put a card with a numeral printed on it in a small bowl and ask him to count out that many paperclips, coins or beans and put them into the bowl with the card. After completing this for a few different bowls, have your child compare and discuss why some bowls have more items than other bowls. As your child becomes comfortable with increasingly complicated math concepts, he will begin to think of himself as "good at math." This confidence will fuel his willingness to approach and persevere through increasingly complicated math activities.
Your child is generally comfortable with numbers and has a well-formed ability to understand and manipulate numbers. It will be important for your child to continue developing a comfort with the more advanced math and number skills such as pattern creation and sorting before he begins school. To promote your child's skill development in this area, consider giving your child a bowl of 4 or 5 different bite-size snacks for dessert and encourage him to eat them in a specific order (such as one grape, one cereal flake, one raisin, one pretzel rod) before repeating the pattern again. Or, put a card with a numeral printed on it in a small bowl and ask him to count out that many paperclips, coins or beans and put them into the bowl with the card. After completing this for a few different bowls, have your child compare and discuss why some bowls have more items than other bowls. As your child becomes comfortable with increasing complicated math concepts, he will begin to think of himself as "good at math." This confidence will fuel his willingness to approach and persevere through increasingly complicated math activities.
Your child is comfortable with numerals, counting, sorting, classifying and creating patterns. As a result, he is poised to excel at the math and number activities he will encounter in the classroom. Continue challenging your child with advanced activities such as creating patterns with four or five items and classifying a group of items into four or five smaller groups based on a dominant characteristic. Or, put a card with a numeral printed on it in a small bowl and ask him to count out that many paperclips, coins or beans and put them into the bowl with the card. After completing this for a few different bowls, have your child compare and discuss why some bowls have more items than other bowls. Through practice, he will continue to hone critical number skills and will gain increased comfort with these challenging activities. As that happens, he will begin to think of himself as "good at math." This confidence will further fuel his willingness to try increasingly complicated math activities and his perseverance to complete them.

Review your responses to Math/Number Awareness questions

Social/Emotional Development

Your child has not yet developed well-formed social or emotional skills. As a result, he likely struggles to make himself understood or interact easily with his peers or other adults. This may be due to his young age. However, he will need to gain increased social and emotional skills in order to interact comfortably with his classmates and manage the new social challenges at school. These challenges include learning to share classroom materials, demonstrating empathy for his peers, and taking turns. He will also be expected to respond appropriately to a teacher's directions, such as when to listen quietly and when to wait patiently, which requires well developed social skills. Through exposure to focused activities that allow him to practice social and emotional skills, he will have opportunities to develop these critical skill sets and be able to enter the classroom with confidence and ease. Consider engaging your child in activities such as discussing possible feelings of storybook characters or playing games that require each player to wait his turn while another player makes a move to help him develop necessary social skills.
Your child is beginning to demonstrate many important social and emotional skills. However, he does not yet have all of the necessary skills to comfortably and consistently interact in an appropriate manner with his classmates and manage the new social challenges at school. These challenges include sharing classroom materials, demonstrating empathy for his peers, and taking turns. Through exposure to focused activities that will engage his social and emotional skills, he will further develop these critical skill sets and be able to enter the classroom with confidence and ease. Consider engaging your child in activities such as discussing possible feelings of storybook characters or playing games that require each player to wait his turn while another player makes a move to help him develop necessary social skills.
Your child possesses many critical social and emotional skills. However, he is not yet consistent in his actions and responses towards those around him. In the classroom, he will be expected to share classroom materials, demonstrate empathy for his peers, and take turns. And he will need to display consistency in his actions to manage these challenges without becoming frustrated. Through exposure to focused activities that promote social and emotional skills, he will further develop these critical skill sets and be able to enter the classroom with confidence and ease. Consider engaging your child in activities such as discussing possible feelings of storybook characters or playing games that require each player to wait his turn while another player makes a move to help him develop necessary social skills.
The kindergarten classroom will include many new social challenges such as sharing classroom materials, demonstrating empathy for his peers, and taking turns. Your child possesses strong social and emotional skills and is ready to tackle these challenges. It will be important to ensure your child is given frequent opportunities to continue practicing his social and emotional skills so he does not regress to displaying improper behaviors. Consider engaging him in activities such as discussing possible feelings of storybook characters or playing games that require each player to wait his turn while another player makes a move. In this way, he will be able to maintain his already strong social and emotional skills.

Review your responses to Social/Emotional Development questions

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