Teaching Your Child Letter Sounds - Worksheets and Activity Suggestions

Understanding the sounds made by each letter is a critical component of reading and writing. As your child is introduced to each letter, gaining familiarity with the sounds made by each letter is an important skill.

If you are interested in beginning-level phonemic awareness worksheets, please see the worksheets on
matching pictures with the same sound. These worksheets focus on one letter’s sound at a time and are perfect for introducing your child to the sound made by each letter.

Once your child is familiar with the sounds made by many letters, the intermediate worksheets on matching words beginning with the same sound will challenge your child even further. These worksheets will require your child to say aloud different words and identify the two words that begin with the same consonant sound. Since each set of matching words contains different ending sounds, your child will need to keenly focus on only the starting sound of each word to correctly identify a matching pair.

Kindergarten worksheets - Matching words beginning with same sound

To help accelerate your child’s phonemic awareness skill development, consider playing a game with him where you take turns making up silly sentences that contain numerous words beginning with the same consonant sound. For example, “Please pass the peas.”  Or, “Betty buys belly buttons.” Challenge your child to see who can create the longest silly sentence.

After your child is comfortable identifying two words that begin with the same sound, introduce him to the advanced worksheets on matching letters and beginning sounds. These worksheets will require your child to consider the sounds made by three different letters at a time, matching each letter to two different pictures that begin with that letter’s sound.

Kindergarten worksheets - Matching letters and beginning sounds

Being able to hear the initial sound of a word and match it to the correct letter is a critical precursor to writing. When writing, your child will need to hear the word in his head, isolate individual sounds within the words, think of the corresponding letter, and then write that letter on the page. When reading, your child will need to identify the sound made by each written letter he sees. As a result, strong phonemic awareness skills will greatly aid your child’s reading and writing fluency.

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